Archive | September 2013

Country singer Rosanne Cash proves to be as strong an author as a songwriter in ‘Composed: A Memoir’

A Crowded Bookshelf

Rosanne Cash is both saddled and gifted with a musical heritage that would make other performers either salivate in envy or hide in their basement in fear. Cash’s dad – country legend Johnny Cash – is a looming figure in both his daughter’s professional and personal worlds. Like Natalie Cole, Liza Minnelli, and Jacob Dylan, Cash managed to transcend her father’s shadow, and forged an interesting career in her own right as a major figure in country music. Like her father, Cash represented a new voice in country music – an urbane, intellectual point of view that wasn’t reared in poverty or rural America – she was more K.T. Oslin than Dolly Parton. After years of being a reliable hitmaker in the 1980s, Cash has become a revered figure in adult country music, honored as much for her own estimable contribution, as for her impressive lineage. As expected, her life has…

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50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom shows us how far we got, and how much further we still have to go

A Crowded Bookshelf

It was 50 years ago today that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stood in front of the Lincoln Memorial to deliver his “I Have a Dream” oration to an estimated crowd of 300,000 participants, calling for a time in our nation when his “four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.”

He began his speech by saying, “But 100 years [after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation], we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years…

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